Rotary Hill Climb Drawing

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RicerDude
28
Joined: Mon Sep 10, 2012 7:21 pm

Re: Rotary Hill Climb Drawing

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New rear wing and slightly higher roll hoop/chassis.

Image

I have separated the rear wing from the gearbox and engine part so I can add more detail to the engine.
What RAM size are we talking about there
I am currently running with just 4GB RAM (3 useable I think). 8GB will probably be enough but then I will need to buy a 64bit operating system which my computer can run.
I am just worried about the intercooler's position
I decided to place the intercooler above the driver because it minimises the length of the turbo tubing which reduces turbo-lag. So I chose to give up a bit of top speed (which isn't really a problem in hill climb) for better acceleration.

gixxer_drew
gixxer_drew
30
Joined: Sat Jul 31, 2010 5:17 pm
Location: Yokohama, Japan

Re: Rotary Hill Climb Drawing

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Tim.Wright wrote: I've always scratched my head at this "leverage" wing theory. A wing behind the rear axle will produce downforce on the rear axle and lift on the front axle. The further back you move it, the more you lift the front. If you then go and "balance that" by adding a big front wing, the front wing will do the opposite. It will put downforce on the front and lift the rear, putting you back at square 1. Why not just use correctly sized wings in the normal positions to start with?

Then again, do you even know where you want your centre of pressure to be?
Rules and packaging constraints mostly, where its tough and easy to make down and where you need it. Where you want the CoP to be is dependant on the layout of the car, track and driver preference.

Examples:
a rear heavy le mans car, run the wing aft of rear axle, run less angle on the wing for better L/D then trim the draggiest front bits. It is a very simple way to trim out and maximize L/D. That is the basics of the "long tail" thing.

On an open wheel car, everything is dictated by the location of the tires. I suppose you could put the wheels in some odd locations wont be a fun meeting about that idea ;)

MadMatt
MadMatt
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Joined: Sat Jan 08, 2011 3:04 pm

Re: Rotary Hill Climb Drawing

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RicerDude wrote:
MadMatt wrote:What RAM size are we talking about there
I am currently running with just 4GB RAM (3 useable I think). 8GB will probably be enough but then I will need to buy a 64bit operating system which my computer can run.
Yea with 32bits you are not using the 4GB, I recon that with 4GB you should be able to do everything, I mean I made a whole car (or so) in CATIA with 4GB and it was more than fine. Was lagging a bit when moving the view around the whole assembly but other than that it was fine.
RicerDude wrote:
MadMatt wrote:I am just worried about the intercooler's position
I decided to place the intercooler above the driver because it minimises the length of the turbo tubing which reduces turbo-lag. So I chose to give up a bit of top speed (which isn't really a problem in hill climb) for better acceleration.
Yes minimizing turbo lag by having short hoses is good, on the other hand you can use other methods to avoid too much lag (antilag system, keeping throttle while braking), but from peps that have worked on Cosworth turbo engines, the lag with a big or small intercooler is not really noticeable.

And good luck with the corners, for me it is the most difficult part of the modelling, but your project looks really neat, hope you can solve your computer issues!

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amouzouris
108
Joined: Mon Feb 14, 2011 7:21 pm

Re: Rotary Hill Climb Drawing

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I really like the new wing

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RicerDude
28
Joined: Mon Sep 10, 2012 7:21 pm

Re: Rotary Hill Climb Drawing

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Managed to find a 64bit upgrade for Windows 7 for £6 :D
I'll see how it runs with that and if its still not enough I'll probably get another couple gig of RAM.

This is how far I got with the rear suspension today.

Image

Image

Larger pics:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/95642800@N ... otostream/
http://www.flickr.com/photos/95642800@N ... otostream/

wesley123
wesley123
223
Joined: Sat Feb 23, 2008 4:55 pm

Re: Rotary Hill Climb Drawing

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You wont find much improvement, you get like 800MB extra, but on the other hand, the 64bits OS consumes more RAM by itself.
"Bite my shiny metal ass" - Bender

Desertrunner
Desertrunner
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Joined: Thu Oct 24, 2013 11:20 pm

Re: Rotary Hill Climb Drawing

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Very interesting concept.

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humble sabot
25
Joined: Sat Feb 17, 2007 9:33 am

Re: Rotary Hill Climb Drawing

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very cool, what's the deal with the gearbox? IS it purely speculative? is it a casing for off the shelf internals? why the megalithic final drive gear?
the four immutable forces:
static balance
dynamic balance
static imbalance
dynamic imbalance

88 Chaser
88 Chaser
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Joined: Tue Jan 07, 2014 10:35 am

Re: Rotary Hill Climb Drawing

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Really cool concept.

tuj
tuj
14
Joined: Fri Jun 15, 2007 2:50 pm

Re: Rotary Hill Climb Drawing

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Wow, 4-rotor, I love it! Nothing sounds as mean as a peripheral port rotary. Are you going to fabricate your own e-shaft?

Marco
Marco
1
Joined: Mon Jan 17, 2011 6:12 pm
Location: Aberdeenshire, Scotland

Re: Rotary Hill Climb Drawing

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Looks cool.
Is it a long wheelbase? It looks long.
I guess the rotary engine gives low COG benefits and a weight saving? Hillclimb cars tend to be shorter wheelbase for sharper change of direction. Also (in the Uk at least) hillclimb courses tend to be fairly uneven and oddly cambered so underfloor airflow and venturi/diffuser to the rear of the car may be difficult to make effective.
Look at something like the GWR Raptor, its a scale down version of the GWR Predator and is a very effective hillclimb car here in the UK. It has won the Scottish hillclimb championship.

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RicerDude
28
Joined: Mon Sep 10, 2012 7:21 pm

Re: Rotary Hill Climb Drawing

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Thanks for all the feedback :)
I haven't been able to update the model for a for a few months now because when I got a new computer I lost my AutoDesk Inventor along with all the files. #-o
These are just a few renders I took of its latest state...
Pics don't work going to have to use links. #-o
The top view does show that the wheelbase was quite long but its hard to tell without the deep dish wheels.
http://www.flickr.com/photos/95642800@N ... otostream/
I was going to get rid of the turbo and pesky intercooler then have the exhaust fan out under the engine and exit out the central hole in the diffuser. Am I right in saying that the velocity of the air exiting the exhaust in a rotary engine is higher because of the increased number of explosions per revolution compared to a piston engine?
http://www.flickr.com/photos/95642800@N ... otostream/
http://www.flickr.com/photos/95642800@N ... otostream/
http://www.flickr.com/photos/95642800@N ... otostream/

Clifford_R
Clifford_R
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Joined: Tue Apr 29, 2014 2:49 pm

Re: Rotary Hill Climb Drawing

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It looks really good even it is incomplete, I would like to see its complete version..., if possible then share that too.

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Mr Nür
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Joined: Sun Jan 06, 2013 5:37 pm

Re: Rotary Hill Climb Drawing

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Amazing project! Looking forward to see it finished!

mzivtins
mzivtins
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Joined: Wed Feb 29, 2012 11:41 am

Re: Rotary Hill Climb Drawing

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Hi RicerDude,

How far has the project come along since your last post? I'm very interested in this as i am embarking on a FF1600/13b Renesis powered journey.

You mentioned a 4 rotor turbo? has your design taken into account the incredible torque? having a turbo on a 4 rotor will most likely destroy most driveline components if super sticky slicks are used (imagine hill-climb events)

DO you have any designs around a two rotor rotary (13b) interested to see how nice and tight the packaging can be, although cooling is a massive issue as rotaries run INCREDIBLY hot compared to the reciprocating engine.

you design looks beautiful, i would love to see it on a tubular frame design. Keep up the good work! if you need any info about cooling and general info on rotaries i would gladly throw some help out there, if i have the knowledge of course :lol: