1:10 Ferrari SF15-T

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kosioBG
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Re: 1:10 Ferrari SF15-T

Post by kosioBG » Sat Mar 24, 2018 10:42 am

Just_a_fan wrote:
Sat Mar 24, 2018 1:55 am
Great job, I'm humbled by the level of detail and care you have applied
Thanks!

Alonso Fan wrote:
Fri Mar 23, 2018 10:59 pm
...to continue my own project too!
looking forward!

Just noticed that F1T has compressed the pictures I posted yesterday, check them out in high quality here.

As for the next report /nosecone/, I'm planning to give you a bit more insight into the exact cardboard forming process: how and where I use which type of cardboard, how exactly it's glued and shaped etc.
Stay tuned!

DiogoBrand
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Re: 1:10 Ferrari SF15-T

Post by DiogoBrand » Sat Mar 24, 2018 10:49 am

I'm not sure what spec you're modelling, but maybe it would be useful for you to have some pictures from Asseto Corsa's model. Having close up pictures from any angle from a car made after the real thing could be helpful on some details.
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kosioBG
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Re: 1:10 Ferrari SF15-T

Post by kosioBG » Sun Mar 25, 2018 12:57 pm

Nosecone
Paper forming in detail

You can check out all the pictures in HQ here

The nosecone is one of the coolest bits to model: one can find tons of pictures, it is a relatively simple piece shapewise, and it's pretty - motivation is high. The first step as with every component is to figure out dimensions precisely:
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Once that's figured, I have to settle on a concept of how exactly the structure will be built. In this case, the main point is to get the stiffness high between the mounting rods and the FW attachment points. So this very area is a single piece 1mm thick cardboard. To it, the rods themselves are firmly attached.
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The bottom surface (actually, there is more material underneath, but you'll see it later) is not as thick, it serves the sole purpose of keeping the side plates at the desired distance. It also gives the nose tip its contour.
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The next step is to get the external shape just right. For that I use a combination of all possible cardboard thicknesses. On the bottom, for exmple, there are two longitudinal spacers on which a curved slightly thicker than normal sheet of paper is glued and curved towards the edges.
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Also on this picture you can see the tubes that will later take the FW.

The top is also a combination of cardboards, the main challenge here is to achieve a perfect curvature. So the top surface is tapered and additional thin pieces fill the gap and allow for bending.
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The holes you see are for the TV cameras

With the structure completed, it's on to the next cool bit: colored covers. Here's a tribute to the many stencils that never earn spotlight - the don't get on the car, but it wouldn't exist without them. I managed to get a single piece of red cardboard to cover the whole nosecone, which results in an improved surface quality. I made use of the kaspersky logo on the side: I could allow for a slot there which enabled two-dimentional bending and I could get away with it as the decal hid it later on.
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Another aspect is sanding: I make my way from P120 through to P1000, which leads to acceptable quality in difficult areas such as the bottom of the nose tip where the cardboard comes from many directions. The type of glue used locally also has an effect on the sanding properties of the cardboard: UHU hart creates a hard sandable block and can be applied on top of already glued bits. Here's how the area developed:
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Applying the carbon fibre texture is nothing too special. I still need to figure out the shape in advance. And of course, decals finish things up.
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The finishing touch comes with the tv-cameras. They have a simple structure: a main red cardboard body with a metal rod keeping the shape and serving for mounting to the nose. And the black and carbon ends are purely decorative.
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Sanding to smoothness plays a role here, too.
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Here is the final product, covered with my two different based varnishes:
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Mounted:
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I managed to build the nosecone completely hollow, which is more realistic than previous attempts of mine. In general, 1:10 is soo different from 1:18 and it's obvious if you compare this to the MP4-30.

That's it for now, do check out the pictures in HQ, because there is so much more detail in them than you can see on this page (link here).

FW next.

Thanks for watching! :)
DiogoBrand wrote:
Sat Mar 24, 2018 10:49 am
maybe it would be useful for you to have some pictures from Asseto Corsa's model
Where can I find this model?

Alonso Fan
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Re: 1:10 Ferrari SF15-T

Post by Alonso Fan » Sun Mar 25, 2018 1:09 pm

kosioBG wrote:
Sun Mar 25, 2018 12:57 pm

Where can I find this model?
Assetto corsa is a simulator on PC and console. He means that you can see the car in much more detail in game and pick up on details which won't be easily visible in pictures. When he says 'model' he is referring to the 3d model in the game.
MVRC - SHM Racing

kosioBG
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Re: 1:10 Ferrari SF15-T

Post by kosioBG » Sun Mar 25, 2018 1:49 pm

kosioBG wrote:
Sun Mar 25, 2018 12:57 pm

the 3d model in the game.
Sure, but where can I find the 3d model? I searched for it but couldn't really find it

Alonso Fan
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Re: 1:10 Ferrari SF15-T

Post by Alonso Fan » Sun Mar 25, 2018 2:02 pm

kosioBG wrote:
Sun Mar 25, 2018 1:49 pm
kosioBG wrote:
Sun Mar 25, 2018 12:57 pm

the 3d model in the game.
Sure, but where can I find the 3d model? I searched for it but couldn't really find it
You won't be able to find it anywhere. You can view it extensively in game though
MVRC - SHM Racing

kosioBG
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Re: 1:10 Ferrari SF15-T

Post by kosioBG » Sat Apr 07, 2018 7:51 pm

Front wing
HQ pics here

Following the nosecone, the logical next step is the FW. There is nothing too special from a modelling point of view here. I did, however, have to slightly modify the way I build it up in comparison to the previous 1:18 wings. So I started with a base plate (the neutral aerofoil in the middle) which is supported by a metal wire and also holds the rods that attach it to the nose. On top of it came the first three elements (red), based on one whole piece. The current 1:10 scale allowed me to more closely copy the bends in the wing.
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figuring the shape out
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covering the shape with a thin red/carbon sheet took way more time than you might imagine
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Finally, I added the two missing elements. It's extraordinary how the airflow is directed outward in such a complex, step-by-step manner. Mind the fact that there is a gap all over the length of the endplate between it and the flaps.
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The last of 5 days I spent on the FW was for the small flaps at the front. And I also varnished, just the usual combination of a water based primer and a top gloss finish. About 80 pieces look like this:
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it's so glossy, the "P" from V-Power is mirrored on the surface of the vertical element 8)
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Mounted /preliminary/:
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Thanks for watching! :D
Kosio

kosioBG
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Re: 1:10 Ferrari SF15-T

Post by kosioBG » Mon Dec 31, 2018 3:51 pm

hey guys, just wanted to inform you that loads of new content is on its way very shortly! I will post soon, but in the meantime, go check my website! Have a good 2019 :)

kosioBG
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Re: 1:10 Ferrari SF15-T

Post by kosioBG » Fri Jan 11, 2019 3:49 pm

Suspension

After a substantial period of stagnation, I finally gathered some motivation to go on with my project. The area of the car that had to be dealt with was the suspension. Basically, the general technique remains largely the same as in previous projects. This time, however, the scale gave me the benefit of being able to more precisely replicating the shapes of the wishbones themselves. I could decide, in every single case, weather it is more suitable to use tubes or 2D planks. In both scenarios, though, a metal rod runs through the whole wishbone and at the same times serves as a connector to the chassis. One significant improvement over previous cars was that I managed to build the parts relatively accurately and selected the distance between the two ends of each wishbone to be slightly longer than the corresponding mounting points on the chassis. Thus, I could mount them by gently stretching them and they held themselves in place by slight internal stress. The other benefit of the scale was the fact I could easily wrap the wishbones in carbon, which worked very well on the front and a bit less elegantly on the back.
Of course, as in every component, the initial drawing was critical. To make sure everything would fit together later on, I built a jig that visualizes the axle position and ride height (front and rear). Luckily, suspension pictures are readily available, so this was not that much of a challenge. The more difficult area was of course the rear suspension, but I’ll come to that in a minute and you’ll see why in the pictures.
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The front suspension was mostly a joy to build. As the wishbones are pretty airfoil-shaped, so I chose to use flat pieces of my second-thickest cardboard (~0,5mm) and then sanded them to shape. Laying the carbon fibre on top of that was easy.
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Another major improvement are the uprights. Now, I integrated the axle holders. The wishbones attach with a press-fit and the whole assembly remains comparatively compact, so that room remains for the brakes etc. This solution is sufficiently stiff.
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The front brake ducts worked out wonderfully. Sculpting the air inlets and their curvature was enjoyable. A nice detail is that they actually transfer air towards the axle, so if you blow them from the front, you can feel the outward flow.
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And another detail about the process: I love building while talking to friends on messenger 😊
Finally, I assembled the wishbones, pullrods, brake ducts and uprights.
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Next, I moved to the rear counterpart of that assembly, leaving the brake system for later.

The process here is pretty much analogous. The differences are that the wishbones are slenderer, which poses a challenge to the carbon coating. Also, there are a lot more components in a tighter area: apart from the wishbones and pullrod, there’s also the track rod and the drive shaft, all of which have to fit through the rearmost extension of the bodywork. So here’s what the uprights, wishbones and rear brake ducts look like:
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Before I could move on and install all of these parts, I had to build the bodywork area mentioned earlier. This was as much fun as it was a challenge, as is with every piece which is characterized by a complex, multidirectional curvature. I had to cut out several prototypes before I arrived at the final shape.
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Now, recreating such a curvature means introducing a slot somewhere in the paper blank to enable it to approximately bend in more than one plane. The challenge is to do that in such a way that the slot is hidden in the final product. A trick I use is to look at the decals and try to slot the paper below one of the sponsor logos/transitions, so it gets covered. This time, the transition between the red section and the carbon fibre underside was the perfect spot. Some sanding was required, and after I added the decals and treated the bodywork with my two varnishes, that was the result:
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Only then was I able to fit everything together. This was significantly trickier than the front suspension, as most components were overconstrained, having to fit both through the (narrow) bodywork opening and to the gearbox casing mounting points while still remaining properly oriented.
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Next, I moved on to the brakes/brake covers. I paid more attention to the front brakes, as their covers are less enclosed and allow more of a view of the finished assembly. As far as detailing is concerned, I built the discs, calipers, mounting support, wheel axle, nut and wheel mounting points. Some internals such as brake fluid pipes, electrical components or exact turning mechanisms are missing, because I really lacked the patience to build something so tiny that would not be visible once the car was completed.
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The whole assembly was covered with the drums, one relatively simple component with cooling slots and a diameter of 33mm. And the front suspension was complete.
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A very similar procedure followed for the rear brakes, their calipers are just a bit less detailed. Also, note how the rear axles are not hollow (blown) – they end with a sharp cone.
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The rear drums are more enclosed. I had to build them from 4 pieces: the main drum cylinder, then a transition cone, then a ring , and finally, another cone facing inwards. In reality, all of this is a continuous rotational piece, but that would be near impossible to make at that scale.
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Sadly, a picture of the carbon-covered result at that stage is not available (i.e. I forgot), so check it out in the next reports.

That's it for now, tune in next friday, when the next report will be published :)
Thanks for watching

kosioBG
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Re: 1:10 Ferrari SF15-T

Post by kosioBG » Fri Jan 18, 2019 11:48 am

Rear wing

Building the rear wing is one of the most enjoyable areas of the whole car. That’s because of several reasons: pictures are readily available, the mounting points are already specified and there is enough free room around, no further components depend on it. It is merely a case of letting the fingers loose and detailing as much as possible.
Starting with the endplates, the goal is to recreate as many of the aerodynamic slots as possible. This is not easy in areas such as the top leading corner, where I am limited by the thickness of the cardboard (which strictly speaking, is not to scale: 1:10 would mean, in the case of the endplate, a structure with poor stiffness). Still, most of the grooves and dents are present in my model in some form or another. It is very interesting to try and deduce how the aerodynamics experts have tried to direct air both in- and outwards in different areas in an effort to achieve maximum diffuser and wing efficiency.
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I decided to build the mounting pylon and lower wing as one part to reach maximum stiffness. It was a fun part to sculpt; I approached it similarly to the way I’d build a suspension part. The wing itself is a simple curved airfoil.
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However, pay closer attention at the front view of the finished wing and you’ll see a curvature along the width axis as well (it is slightly higher where the pylon is compared to the endplate mounting points).
All the parts next to each other and the final result (varnished, of course):
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Thanks for watching!
The report on the bodywork will be out next friday :D

Alonso Fan
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Re: 1:10 Ferrari SF15-T

Post by Alonso Fan » Fri Jan 18, 2019 7:00 pm

Nice to see that you found the time and motivation to continue.

My mcl 32 is still in a box high up on a shelf, still just a monocoque with a rushed airbox.

I've moved on to planes....
MVRC - SHM Racing

kosioBG
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Re: 1:10 Ferrari SF15-T

Post by kosioBG » Fri Jan 25, 2019 10:25 am

Bodywork

I must admit I was initially a bit scared of building the bodywork. It is such a large area that determines how the whole car looks and any asymmetries or less-than-perfect fits could be disastrous. However, this also means that due to its size, it’s one of the areas which are most satisfying because of high bang-for-buck (or in this case, effort) ratio.

I started with the top section. I had to take the fin and the mounting points to the airbox (the front end) into account. Also, I had to make sure that the cardboard on both sides curves towards the middle; the shape had to be smooth.
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The sidepods were trickier and required more prototypes to get right. I used the same technique that was extensively described in the suspension report (rear bodywork). Also, I had to rework the floor a bit to ensure a good fit at the front end. Luckily, this alteration was quite precise and now the vertical limiters on the floor hold the bodywork well.
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The vertical elements that attach to front floor end were not difficult to make. They are connected to the floor flap via two metal rods. Once I got their shape and position right, I glued them to the sidepods. The white line is something I came to appreciate: a cool design feature which, if you take a close look at a side view of the car, runs from the front wing right to the very edge of the rear wing in roughly the trajectory of airflow (check out Chainbear’s video on f1 livery).
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Applying decals and varnishing was extremely satisfying. It just changes the look of the whole car dramatically and it suddenly stands in front of you in all its glory (almost); it’s a completely different object compared to its previous naked self. The only suboptimal area is the leading edge and the Claro logo: the thickness of the cockpit bodywork that matches is different and the fit isn’t perfectly smooth.
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Overall, I’m pretty happy with the outcome. I managed to get the shape and stiffness of the bodywork such that it fits relatively well without help from glue or additional structural pieces. To remove the panels, I have to detach the sidepods first, then pull upwards and backwards at the same time. Of course, I’ll try to not do this too often, as the cardboard might weaken at some critical contact points. Also, take a look at how the Shell logo and some cardboard sanding almost completely hid the slot that was necessary to achieve the curvature.
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Cheers!
Next report (cockpit details) will be out next friday, so stay tuned :D

Noetiepoerker26
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Re: 1:10 Ferrari SF15-T

Post by Noetiepoerker26 » Fri Jan 25, 2019 11:50 am

Spectular! I can only imagine how much time and effort you've already put into this build...
Two stroke: a little more than half the power, twice as often.

miguelalvesreis
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Re: 1:10 Ferrari SF15-T

Post by miguelalvesreis » Sun Jan 27, 2019 11:07 pm

Amazing work!
Truly Spectacular!

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garyjpaterson
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Re: 1:10 Ferrari SF15-T

Post by garyjpaterson » Mon Jan 28, 2019 12:52 pm

This is amazing! I see so many parallels between this and the 3D models I make - big difference being I'm not hindered by my clumsy fingers getting in the way, and if I make a mistake I can always undo! Huge respect :D