2 stroke thread (with occasional F1 relevance!)

All that has to do with the power train, gearbox, clutch, fuels and lubricants, etc. Generally the mechanical side of Formula One.
uniflow
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Re: 2 stroke thread (with occasional F1 relevance!)

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Good first guess, manolis.
a few points, there is no separate air pump, I use the two crankcases. K is the rotary disc valve intake.
E is one of the three exhaust ports.
F and I are water cooling ports, cylinder is fully water jacketed.
H is the intake to the top transfer ports.
C are lugs for Transfer Port Injection TPI
Three transfers from the bottom crankcase ( cold end ) and three transfer ports from the top crankcase ( hot end )

There are three key novel components to this design. New piston construction method to help control thermal loading on the exhaust piston.
New combustion chamber type, always a problem with this type of engine.
New scavenge system, also a problem with homogenous charge uniflow engines. Actually there has been bugger all work done on homogenous charge uniflow and zero on crank case pumped OP.
This engine is designed to run three tuned pipes or at least three headers into one larger pipe. There will be two gates at two of the exhaust ports, shut down gas flow area at lower rpms, all three wide open at full power.

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PlatinumZealot
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uniflow wrote:
Mon Sep 28, 2020 9:07 pm
Are you talking my uniflow, or general?

Ideas to Commercialization? Easy just put it on YouTube and let anyone have it.
Your uniflow i meant.
At my former job we had some giant ship engines that were uniflow. Scavenge ports at the bottom of the liner and one exhaust valve at the top of the cylinder.
Was trying to orient myself to your engine layout to figure out how the flow goes through it.
Not driving a Mercedes? Work harder!

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PlatinumZealot
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manolis wrote:
Tue Sep 29, 2020 5:46 pm
Hello Tok-Tokkie

Amazing the video in "your" link:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-7N24DsQMkU

Most of the time Browning flies at 1 to 2m height from the ground. Safely.

Great music; however the real sound (noise) cannot help being unaffordable (supersonic velocity of the exhaust gas).

Browning flies with his jetpack intuitively:
  • Control unit: Browning’s brain
    Sensors: Browning’s eyes and otoliths.
    Servomechanisms: Browning’s bones and muscles.


Thanks
Manolis Pattakos
Manolis. I was watching his launch very closely..

He starts with his spine tilted forward. Thust making forward thrust. This is easy for him because his jetpack is on his back, very close to his body's main centre of rotation. (low radius of gyration).

He uses his arms to stabilize yaw and pitch.

And hips for banking and such.

I think your machine... I dont think it is impossible. But it think it requires a great deal more strength because the longer lever the pilot has to fight against.

What if you put a mechanism on the pilots back that can multiply the force of tilt of the body to the machine? Almost like a light exoskeleton?
Not driving a Mercedes? Work harder!

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coaster
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It sounds like a cross breed of a 2 stroke diesel and an aspin valve replacing the poppet valves.
Aspin variants seize often and sealing breaks down, i trust you have a novel solution.
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manolis
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Hello Uniflow.

I think you mean G (and not H) as the “intake to the top transfer ports" (H seems to be the top end of the cylinder bore).

Image


More guesses / questions:
  • One only spark plug?

    The two crankcases (the hot (at top) and the cold) communicate freely through the G (unless you have another rotary valve, at the other side of the bottom crankcase, to control the "top" transfer ports).

    The top (or exhaust) crankshaft is advanced for some degrees (Hugo Junkers used 11 degrees phase difference in his Diesel Opposed Pistons) relative to the bottom crankshaft to give asymmetric timing? If yes, shouldn’t you take the power from the exhaust crankshaft to reduce the loading on the synchronizing gearing?

    What synchronization gearing is used between the two crankshafts? Without covers I suppose it is made by sprockets / toothed belt.

    A photo of the engine from the other side of the cylinder would help. Or some drawings.

Note: If you are thinking of patenting something (to protect your Intellectuall Property), don't show it and don't explain it.

Thanks
Manolis Pattakos

manolis
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Hello Coaster.

A two-stroke rotary valve has nothing to do with the (four-stroke) Aspin rotary valve; the one runs at less than, say, 2 bar pressure, and deals with cold gas, the other runs at full combustion pressures and is the "wall" (the roof) over (and in direct contact with) the-red hot (or say: white-hot?) burning gas.


The two-stroke Rotax 580 (used in many lightweight Flying Devices) uses a single rotary valve for its two cylinders and runs reliably.



Thanks
Manolis Pattakos

manolis
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Re: 2 stroke thread (with occasional F1 relevance!)

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Hello PlatinumZealot.

You write:
“Manolis. I was watching his launch very closely..
He starts with his spine tilted forward. Thust making forward thrust. This is easy for him because his jetpack is on his back, very close to his body's main centre of rotation. (low radius of gyration).
He uses his arms to stabilize yaw and pitch.
And hips for banking and such.”



Browning takes a good part of the upwards thrust by the four turbines secured on his arms.
The turbine at his back provides upward thrust and forward thrust.
By bending his back, he aligns the percentage of upward / forward thrust provided by his back turbine.

Immediately after his take off, either Browning is bending his back or Browning is bending his legs relative to his rest body, is the same.
The only that happens is the displacement of his overall center of gravity relative to the overall thrust axis.

Yes Browning can vector the thrust of the four turbines secured on his arms / hands without changing the posture of his body.
But think the drawbacks of his architecture:
  • his hands cannot help being tired soon (think if the flight duration was not 5 minutes, but 2 hours),

    he cannot use his hands (even if he gets fire, his arms / hands deal with the four turbines and the thrust they provide),

    he cannot grab anything to lift (say, at a rescue), etc, etc.
Browning flies amazingly, but in the "background" there are several serious issues the average observer cannot get.



You also write:
“I think your machine... I dont think it is impossible. But it think it requires a great deal more strength because the longer lever the pilot has to fight against.

What if you put a mechanism on the pilots back that can multiply the force of tilt of the body to the machine? Almost like a light exoskeleton?"



See this animation once more:

Image

The engines / propellers lift their own weight and the weight of the pilot.

It is not the pilot that holds the Portable Flyer, it is the Portable Flyer that holds (and pulls upwards) the pilot.

With the engines stopped or idling (say, before take off or after landing), the pilot does lift the Portable Flyer. But from take-off to landing, the Portable Flyer lifts the pilot.

The pilot needs not to bend his back:
  • He just bends his legs (relative to his rest body),
    the overall center of gravity moves forwards (to the right, in the animation) away from the thrust axis,
    and due to the generated torque of the overall weight relative to the trust axis the pilot and the Portable Flyer on his back/torso turn clockwise,
    the pilot opens a little more the throttle (to not lose height due to the reduction of the upwards thrust),
    and the forwards flight begins.
    Soon after, the pilot has to straighten his legs to cancel out the abovementioned torque and so to stop the clockwise turn.
Is it clearer now?

After 2 hours of continuous flight, the Portable Flyer pilot will ask for more.
After 5 minutes of flight, Browning will ask to rest for a few hours before making his next "5 minutes" flight.

Note:
To bend your legs (not necessarily keeping them straight) is easy and fast (when you go upstairs you do it repeatedly bending one leg at a time; in the Portable Flyer you do it with both legs; and if you bend the one leg forwards and the other backwards (see the animation) you have the yaw control).

Thanks
Manolis Pattakos

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coaster
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Mork calling Orson, come in Orson.
Its time to build a test rig and prove once and for all this vectoring.
Remember gyroscopic force is the enemy of your theory, once those blades spin crazy fast they become 'solid' or fixed from movement much like a gyroscope.

I suggest a large servo rc controller, flysky 9x 2nd hand of gumtree, and a weight shift mechanism.
The are Polulu boards which convert an rc signal into step and direction. Big torque from an rc controller, look into it hey?
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Tommy Cookers
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coaster wrote:
Thu Oct 01, 2020 9:21 am
.... gyroscopic force is the enemy of your theory, once those blades spin crazy fast they become 'solid' or fixed from movement much like a gyroscope.....
not so ?
there's no change in the angular momentum sum of proprotor 'pack' when its rotational axes experience angular displacement
so no work is required to do such displacement and no resistance to displacement is produced by such displacement
(I guess)


other random points will be made here .......

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coaster
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Nanu nanu, precession be damned lets fly!
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Rodak
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Re: 2 stroke thread (with occasional F1 relevance!)

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To bend your legs (not necessarily keeping them straight) is easy and fast (when you go upstairs you do it repeatedly bending one leg at a time; in the Portable Flyer you do it with both legs; and if you bend the one leg forwards and the other backwards (see the animation) you have the yaw control).
Again, manolis, you are comparing apples to oranges. Hanging, supported from above, and lifting your legs is totally different from climbing stairs where you are supported by the other leg.... Build a model and test it.

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PlatinumZealot
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Rodak wrote:
Thu Oct 01, 2020 3:02 pm
To bend your legs (not necessarily keeping them straight) is easy and fast (when you go upstairs you do it repeatedly bending one leg at a time; in the Portable Flyer you do it with both legs; and if you bend the one leg forwards and the other backwards (see the animation) you have the yaw control).
Again, manolis, you are comparing apples to oranges. Hanging, supported from above, and lifting your legs is totally different from climbing stairs where you are supported by the other leg.... Build a model and test it.
He can use a radio controlled doll with bendable torso to test he theory.

I am not familiar with drones... (maybe it is about time to get one?) but I know the flight controller can control stability. He could use it to control the bending of the waist via servo.
Even do it in two directions. Would be interesting stuff.
Not driving a Mercedes? Work harder!

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coaster
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These are the 'go to' people for radio controlled robotics, these parts enable drone electronics to be scaled up to life sized projects.
This will unlock all your flyers potential.

https://www.pololu.com/category/212/tic ... ontrollers
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gruntguru
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Tommy Cookers wrote:
Thu Oct 01, 2020 11:53 am
coaster wrote:
Thu Oct 01, 2020 9:21 am
.... gyroscopic force is the enemy of your theory, once those blades spin crazy fast they become 'solid' or fixed from movement much like a gyroscope.....
not so ?
there's no change in the angular momentum sum of proprotor 'pack' when its rotational axes experience angular displacement
so no work is required to do such displacement and no resistance to displacement is produced by such displacement
(I guess)
Correct - but more importantly, Manolis' design has contra-rotating propellers so there is zero gyroscopic torque under all conditions. (Two equal and opposite gyroscopic torques are generated and react as a bending moment through the shaft to cancel each other)
je suis charlie

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coaster
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I dont believe one cancels the other, it still exists and resists sudden movements.
The weight of the blade is all im going by and the pf has chunky flat steel in the photos.
Timber might be an improvement, or fibreglass, carbon cloth.
Every clue shared by Manolis is all we can go by, i dont believe he is here for help or advice.
We are merely observers of his, thing.
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