3 engine preservation tactics

All that has to do with the power train, gearbox, clutch, fuels and lubricants, etc. Generally the mechanical side of Formula One.
nevill3
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Re: 3 engine preservation tactics

Post by nevill3 » Sat Feb 24, 2018 1:24 pm

After reading the regulations the teams are restricted to adding only one extra component per event, any further replacements at subsequent events would incur extra penalties but would not require that the original replacement be handed back. That is my interpretation, so a team could on consecutive race weekends take penalties for new engine parts but would end up with extra engines for the rest of the season
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ESPImperium
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Re: 3 engine preservation tactics

Post by ESPImperium » Sat Feb 24, 2018 9:31 pm

Yes, they may be restricted, however toward the end of the season, those components could be used to run more on a Friday. We know that many components from horror accidents and break downs over the past few years have came back into working order later in the season.

I think there will be tactical, if cynical, changes. I think there is a loop hole in the rules, and it will be shown this year.

The rules will be tested through the season, possibly, if not probably harder than any other season before now.

wuzak
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Re: 3 engine preservation tactics

Post by wuzak » Sun Feb 25, 2018 3:08 am

nevill3 wrote:
Sat Feb 24, 2018 1:24 pm
After reading the regulations the teams are restricted to adding only one extra component per event, any further replacements at subsequent events would incur extra penalties but would not require that the original replacement be handed back. That is my interpretation, so a team could on consecutive race weekends take penalties for new engine parts but would end up with extra engines for the rest of the season
But you cannot run a new engine (ie above the 3 unit allocation) in FP2, a new engine in FP3 and a new engine in Qualifying/race. They would only be able to use the one from qualifying/race again.

nevill3
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Re: 3 engine preservation tactics

Post by nevill3 » Sun Feb 25, 2018 9:54 am

The regulations would not prohibit the running of the extra used engines from a single event in future races but they would incur further grid penalties if they did use anything but the last to be introduced engine. The teams surely would of course elect to use a completely new unit rather than a used one due to the subsequent penalty.

What the regulation is unclear about is whether a team that has used five units would still be able to use any of the five units from their "pool" or whether the FIA would require them to "hand back" one of the older units to maintain a pool of only three ICE,Turbo etc...

The regulation clearly states further use of multiple units ( edit... over their allowance) introduced over a single event are subject to further penalties but does not specifically disbar the further use of units introduced over different events. Tactically teams having a couple of disastrous weekends, maybe because a slight accident in P3 prevents them running in qualifying could introduce a new engine for the race and would then be able to use that extra engine, penalty free, in their pool for the rest of the season.
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ESPImperium
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Re: 3 engine preservation tactics

Post by ESPImperium » Sun Feb 25, 2018 2:23 pm

Thats what Im saying, they don't have to hand the component back. They shall continue to use that component in FP1/FP2 however component 4 will be used from FP3/Quali/Race.

It in turn will mean less milage on the race components, especially in the mid season if, to my guess, those components will do 8 races.

Minimising the component stress on Friday sessions will be key i think, the engine guys will be keen to see as little of a duty cycle put into any component, however the aero and mechanical (suspension) guys will want as much time on track for as much data as possible. Leading to conflict, conflict that will somewhere find a loophole, a loophole that will lead to penalties taken for tactical reasons to gain an advantage of the least milage on engine components to give the most milage to the aero and mechanical areas of the garage. Id say Singapore and Russia will be the tracks that penalties are taken for some as they may be sub optimal tracks for some cars.

nevill3
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Re: 3 engine preservation tactics

Post by nevill3 » Sun Feb 25, 2018 2:58 pm

I do not think that any extra units used above the allowed number introduced in the same event,can be used for any of the practice or qualifying sessions in the future without incurring a new penalty. The only units that can be used without penalty is the one that was introduced last and any of the original allowance.

However if at a subsequent event a further unit was introduced the team would receive another penalty and would be able to add that to their pool of allowed units.
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Bisonas
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Re: 3 engine preservation tactics

Post by Bisonas » Sun Feb 25, 2018 7:32 pm

IMO it will come down to what failures each driver will have.
I don't see cars retiring for saving mileage, especially in the first half of the championship. Teams and engine manufactures will need the as many race data as possible in the start.It is more possible to happen in the second half of the championship when component allocation numbers will dictate what is needed to be done.

But if a car has some early failures for what ever reason and the allocation plans go out of the window early on and after putting on the highest number part allowed (3 or 2 regarding the engine component), i guess we are gonna see strategic penalties to add extra parts on the allocation pool on specific races, which is either easy to pass (for front runners) or not so favorite tracks (for middle field runners).
It will come down to how early each driver is forced to use his highest number part allowed.

ESPImperium
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Re: 3 engine preservation tactics

Post by ESPImperium » Tue Feb 27, 2018 8:23 pm

Renault F1 team already considering strategic 2018 grid penalties
Renault Formula 1 managing director Cyril Abiteboul admits his team is considering factoring strategic grid penalties into its 2018 season, in order to maximise engine performance.
https://www.autosport.com/f1/news/13456 ... ty-tactics

Renault clearly agree, they see a opportunity to take a tactical penalty somewhere in order to maximise performance and keep lifeing low on components.

marmer
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Re: 3 engine preservation tactics

Post by marmer » Tue Feb 27, 2018 9:44 pm

ESPImperium wrote:
Renault F1 team already considering strategic 2018 grid penalties
Renault Formula 1 managing director Cyril Abiteboul admits his team is considering factoring strategic grid penalties into its 2018 season, in order to maximise engine performance.
https://www.autosport.com/f1/news/13456 ... ty-tactics

Renault clearly agree, they see a opportunity to take a tactical penalty somewhere in order to maximise performance and keep lifeing low on components.
Any race where a power advantage allows overtaking would be best.
Perhaps limb through the open of the season until you can introduce a new spec as your 2nd engine instead of introducing any before then

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Re: 3 engine preservation tactics

Post by Jolle » Tue Feb 27, 2018 9:51 pm

ESPImperium wrote:
Tue Feb 27, 2018 8:23 pm
Renault F1 team already considering strategic 2018 grid penalties
Renault Formula 1 managing director Cyril Abiteboul admits his team is considering factoring strategic grid penalties into its 2018 season, in order to maximise engine performance.
https://www.autosport.com/f1/news/13456 ... ty-tactics

Renault clearly agree, they see a opportunity to take a tactical penalty somewhere in order to maximise performance and keep lifeing low on components.
I don’t think you must take too much at this point too seriously. Renault hasn’t had the best reliability during the hybrid seasons (I believe all their cars had penalties?) compared to Ferrari and Mercedes almost none. This could be just covering their failing reliability (again)