2022 Aerodynamic Regulations Thread

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jjn9128
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Re: 2022 Aerodynamic Regulations Thread

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It’s the same balance as now. Longer floors generate more downforce if they can maintain low pressure. Which the vanes at the tunnel inlet will help do. I can’t imagine anyone will show up with a wheelbase less than 3500mm but expect most to max their allowance.
#aerogandalf
"There is one big friend. It is downforce. And once you have this it’s a big mate and it’s helping a lot." Robert Kubica

Tommy Cookers
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Re: 2022 Aerodynamic Regulations Thread

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CMSMJ1 wrote:
Mon Jan 17, 2022 10:15 am
wogx wrote:
Mon Jan 17, 2022 10:08 am
Remember about CoG, teams were using longer gearboxes to push rear axle as far as they could.
The polar moment of inertia is impacted by longer cars though isn't it? There must be a sweet spot, but I suspect that the massive aero gains from longer floors manages to trump everything else.
yes ....
re the inertia(s) .... I think ....

the (absolute) polar moment of inertia doesn't matter
because the PMI doesn't exist in isolation from the force system that will create yaw of that polar inertia
the force system work generated (by lateral wheel forces) is proportional to (the square of) the wheelbase
ie lengthening the car will give less 'relative PMI' (resistance to yaw) - though absolute PMI is greater
(anyway the car will actually try to resist yaw about the centroid of minimum inertia in yaw)

for about 25 years GP cars were supposedly designed for a large PMI
but IMO the 'relative PMI' wasn't larger (because the wheelbase was)
longer wheelbase has less change in wheel grip with acceleration & deceleration (sometimes good, sometimes not)
Last edited by Tommy Cookers on Mon Jan 17, 2022 3:13 pm, edited 2 times in total.

Slo Poke
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Re: 2022 Aerodynamic Regulations Thread

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This year’s atmospheric bulldozers, I think we shall quickly realise, are going to be all about weight, power and gearing and very little else.
Then again! If we’re Lucky, we may even get to witness, one maybe two, episodes of seized steering! How Great would that be?

That’s just a warning! Cuz what the ‘ell do I know?

wogx
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Re: 2022 Aerodynamic Regulations Thread

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Referring to MCL36 Speculation Thread - there will be no Y250 vortex this year, but what with the vortexes generated by FWEP tips? Can we assume, that they will be useful in any way, or the faces of front tires are too close to FWEP & the vortices won't create/will die instantly?

mzso
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Re: 2022 Aerodynamic Regulations Thread

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Holm86 wrote:
Mon Jan 17, 2022 9:50 am

In 2022 we don't have flat floors, and outwash is practically impossible, so will we actually see a short wheelbase concept by one or more teams?? To have the upper hand on tighter tracks???
More floor area still means more aerodynamic surface to produce downforce, doesn't it?

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Holm86
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Re: 2022 Aerodynamic Regulations Thread

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mzso wrote:
Mon Jan 17, 2022 6:28 pm
Holm86 wrote:
Mon Jan 17, 2022 9:50 am

In 2022 we don't have flat floors, and outwash is practically impossible, so will we actually see a short wheelbase concept by one or more teams?? To have the upper hand on tighter tracks???
More floor area still means more aerodynamic surface to produce downforce, doesn't it?
Well yes, but with a flat floor surface area is much more important, with tunnels the inlet/throat and and expansion area is more important, but thats already pretty specified by the regulations.

*btw I didn't downvote your post

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west52keep64
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Re: 2022 Aerodynamic Regulations Thread

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I'm surprised these nose examples by jjn9128 haven't been posted here:


It's almost a little sad to see how restricted the nose has become, I hope we see a little more variation than this.

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jjn9128
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Re: 2022 Aerodynamic Regulations Thread

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west52keep64 wrote:
Tue Jan 18, 2022 12:30 pm
I'm surprised these nose examples by jjn9128 haven't been posted here:

It's almost a little sad to see how restricted the nose has become, I hope we see a little more variation than this.
I'm surprised/disappointed didn't post this one :lol:
#aerogandalf
"There is one big friend. It is downforce. And once you have this it’s a big mate and it’s helping a lot." Robert Kubica

wogx
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Re: 2022 Aerodynamic Regulations Thread

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Image
Aerodynamic Studies of a 2022 F1 Car

In a couple of months the 2022 Formula 1 season will get underway with probably the largest single change to the aerodynamic regulations in its history. I couldn’t pass up the opportunity to do some aero investigations of my own, so today I want to share my concept of a 2022 car before the first real designs are unveiled.
https://maxtayloraero.wordpress.com/202 ... 22-f1-car/

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Stu
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Re: 2022 Aerodynamic Regulations Thread

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wogx wrote:
Tue Jan 18, 2022 4:04 pm
https://maxtayloraero.files.wordpress.c ... _image.png
Aerodynamic Studies of a 2022 F1 Car

In a couple of months the 2022 Formula 1 season will get underway with probably the largest single change to the aerodynamic regulations in its history. I couldn’t pass up the opportunity to do some aero investigations of my own, so today I want to share my concept of a 2022 car before the first real designs are unveiled.
https://maxtayloraero.wordpress.com/202 ... 22-f1-car/
That is a decent read & good to see some of the ‘what-ifs’ run through CFD; personally I hope that the radiator inlets don’t look like that and the flow around the underside of that (and the rear of the pod), look to be having a strange effect (it looks as though there is an area of stagnating, but turbulent flow at the rear of the pod.
The more that I learn, the more I appreciate how much more there is to know….

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godlameroso
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Re: 2022 Aerodynamic Regulations Thread

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Prandl-Meyer expansion waves, I don't know if the team behind the regulations had this in mind. To me, my personal opinion, the floor fences and the shape of the tunnels, I can't help but see analogue in a jet engine. The fences acting like diffusers to slow down the airflow, while the car travelling forward, acts like the rotor vanes accelerating air through the diffuser. The narrowing path of the inlet tunnels, similar to a jet engine to keep the velocity of the compressed air constant despite the increasing pressure ratio caused by the stator/floor fences.

At a 2:1 inlet to throat ratio you have choked flow, and depending on the floor geometry, there is the possibility to create Prandl-Meyer expansion waves. With expansion waves/fans, the airflow actually increases in velocity with increased volume. It is the opposite to subsonic flow, which slows down when diffused, and accelerated when constricted/nozzled.
Saishū kōnā

Marty_Y
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Re: 2022 Aerodynamic Regulations Thread

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Scalexf1
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Re: 2022 Aerodynamic Regulations Thread

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There does not seem to be much focus on the front wing end plates in most of the discussions here.
Normally this area of the car is not attracting too much attention, however now the defined regulations do not allow the endplate to block the migration of air coming in under the front wing from the sides, as the front wing is mandated to join the endplate seamlessly, so it does not extend below the bottom of the front wing profile.
The end plate cannot be shaped as aggressively as in the past to create out wash ether.
So this area will now define most of what happens downstream behind the front wheels.
Most of the teams on the grid in 2020 were already dropping off the angle of attack on the front wing In front of the tyre to limit the effects downstream of the dreaded tyre squirt.
Only RB we’re running an aggressive outer wing profile in front of the outer edges of the front tyre. Merc experimented with it briefly towards the back end of the 2021 season with a new wing but they did not race it.
The front tyre squirt will hypothetically effect the tunnel entrance fences predominantly the outer fence, hence the vertical angle of the outer tunnel fence could highlight how successful each team is in solving the front tyre squirt problem.
If the outer tunnel fence is straight on the new cars then we can maybe assume that the squirt is under control, as the teams will want to maximise the tunnel entrance volume.
If it’s angled inwards (not so wide at the bottom) then the squirt is still a big problem.
Tyre squirt migrating into the tunnel entrance is definitely not desirable.
The shape and profile of the new front wings will also be interesting if this problem becomes the performance differentiator between cars.
Ramping up the wing profile in the section in front of the tyre and brake ducts will at a guess create more inwash and tyre squirt, so we may also get a surprise when we see the new 2022 front wing profiles.
If we’re expecting wings that look like the conventional wing profiles we’re accustomed to looking at we may get a surprise also.
Any thoughts?

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jjn9128
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Re: 2022 Aerodynamic Regulations Thread

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Stu wrote:
Tue Jan 18, 2022 5:03 pm
wogx wrote:
Tue Jan 18, 2022 4:04 pm
https://maxtayloraero.files.wordpress.c ... _image.png
Aerodynamic Studies of a 2022 F1 Car

In a couple of months the 2022 Formula 1 season will get underway with probably the largest single change to the aerodynamic regulations in its history. I couldn’t pass up the opportunity to do some aero investigations of my own, so today I want to share my concept of a 2022 car before the first real designs are unveiled.
https://maxtayloraero.wordpress.com/202 ... 22-f1-car/
That is a decent read & good to see some of the ‘what-ifs’ run through CFD; personally I hope that the radiator inlets don’t look like that and the flow around the underside of that (and the rear of the pod), look to be having a strange effect (it looks as though there is an area of stagnating, but turbulent flow at the rear of the pod.
There's lots "wrong" with the model, but it's quite an interesting/well structured article.
#aerogandalf
"There is one big friend. It is downforce. And once you have this it’s a big mate and it’s helping a lot." Robert Kubica

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jjn9128
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Re: 2022 Aerodynamic Regulations Thread

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Scalexf1 wrote:
Wed Jan 19, 2022 4:23 am
There does not seem to be much focus on the front wing end plates in most of the discussions here.
Normally this area of the car is not attracting too much attention, however now the defined regulations do not allow the endplate to block the migration of air coming in under the front wing from the sides, as the front wing is mandated to join the endplate seamlessly, so it does not extend below the bottom of the front wing profile.
The end plate cannot be shaped as aggressively as in the past to create out wash ether.
So this area will now define most of what happens downstream behind the front wheels.
Most of the teams on the grid in 2020 were already dropping off the angle of attack on the front wing In front of the tyre to limit the effects downstream of the dreaded tyre squirt.
Only RB we’re running an aggressive outer wing profile in front of the outer edges of the front tyre. Merc experimented with it briefly towards the back end of the 2021 season with a new wing but they did not race it.
The front tyre squirt will hypothetically effect the tunnel entrance fences predominantly the outer fence, hence the vertical angle of the outer tunnel fence could highlight how successful each team is in solving the front tyre squirt problem.
If the outer tunnel fence is straight on the new cars then we can maybe assume that the squirt is under control, as the teams will want to maximise the tunnel entrance volume.
If it’s angled inwards (not so wide at the bottom) then the squirt is still a big problem.
Tyre squirt migrating into the tunnel entrance is definitely not desirable.
The shape and profile of the new front wings will also be interesting if this problem becomes the performance differentiator between cars.
Ramping up the wing profile in the section in front of the tyre and brake ducts will at a guess create more inwash and tyre squirt, so we may also get a surprise when we see the new 2022 front wing profiles.
If we’re expecting wings that look like the conventional wing profiles we’re accustomed to looking at we may get a surprise also.
Any thoughts?
I'd say the innermost tunnel vanes are creating low pressure and downforce, while the outermost are dealing with the front tyre wake. Bear in mind also there are now prescribed/common vanes on the brake drums to help deal with tyre squirt. It's obviously part of what FOM want to achieve - by allowing less optimisation the effect of the wake is less severe - because surfaces are less optimised for free running.

The wheel cover also doesn't get as much focus for how significant an effect it will have on overall aerodynamics. It's all about the floor which punters think they understand, but really don't. See driver61 video ^above.
#aerogandalf
"There is one big friend. It is downforce. And once you have this it’s a big mate and it’s helping a lot." Robert Kubica