Toyota's new nose cone

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Post Mon Nov 19, 2007 12:57 pm

What do you folks think of Toy ota's idea to use the rather wing-shaped nosecone?
Image

The idea seemed interesting, though they changed it for Turkish GP.
Last edited by modbaraban on Mon Nov 19, 2007 1:25 pm, edited 1 time in total.
modbaraban
 
Joined: 5 Apr 2007
Location: Kyiv, Ukraine

Post Mon Nov 19, 2007 1:13 pm

Here is some more information

:arrow: http://www.f1technical.net/development/106
Steven
 
Joined: 19 Aug 2002
Location: Belgium

Post Mon Nov 19, 2007 1:24 pm

Tomba wrote:Here is some more information

:arrow: http://www.f1technical.net/development/106

I's funny how the walrus idea popped up there too...
flatspotter on 05.09.07 at 08:49 wrote:Hmmm, not another walrus I hope.

Do you mean 'all new', as in no parts carried forward, or radically new, as in unconventional (walrus style)?

The trouble with major departures from convention is that whilst they may have some merit and potential, before it can be honed to the point of delivering that potential, your sponsors have beaten a path to someone else’s front door.

...perhaps for the same reason I thought this may be related to the nose-cone idea thread. Anyways...

What are the disadvantages of creating some front downforce there? I wonder if any other team will copy that.
modbaraban
 
Joined: 5 Apr 2007
Location: Kyiv, Ukraine

Post Mon Nov 19, 2007 2:15 pm

I spoke to Pascal Vasselon at Toyota last week, I asked about the late season drooped nose, he said its benefit was more for sensitivty to steering and yaw than for downforce...
scarbs
 
Joined: 8 Oct 2003
Location: Hertfordshire, UK

Post Mon Nov 19, 2007 11:01 pm

Here's the exact quote I took from Pascal on the new nose

"It was a combination front wing development and turning vane. With the front wing usually you take care about the yaw\steer sensitivity of the car, this is where most of the job is done. The target of this nose was mainly to reduce the yaw and steer sensitivity of the front wing. It came together with some efficiency improvements. This is usual when you work with the front wing , you look at its efficiency of course, but you look at all the stability criteria; yaw and steer sensitivity especially."
scarbs
 
Joined: 8 Oct 2003
Location: Hertfordshire, UK

Post Tue Nov 20, 2007 11:11 am

Thanx for that, Craig!
modbaraban
 
Joined: 5 Apr 2007
Location: Kyiv, Ukraine

Post Tue Nov 20, 2007 2:04 pm

scarbs wrote:With the front wing usually you take care about the yaw\steer sensitivity of the car, this is where most of the job is done.


Sensitivity to

what? Downforce dynamics, the predictability thereof (as a function of yaw/steer i.e. no points of discontinuity in reactions to yaw/steering at any speed, only gradual changes)? I just wonder what's the measure of yaw/steer sensitivity when working in a theoretical environment like with CFD (in the preproduction, conceptual, planning stages). There must be some pretty well understood and established criteria if that's where "most of the job is done".
checkered
 
Joined: 2 Mar 2007

Post Tue Nov 20, 2007 5:27 pm

Sensitivity to

what? Downforce dynamics, the predictability thereof (as a function of yaw/steer i.e. no points of discontinuity in reactions to yaw/steering at any speed, only gradual changes)? I just wonder what's the measure of yaw/steer sensitivity when working in a theoretical environment like with CFD (in the preproduction, conceptual, planning stages). There must be some pretty well understood and established criteria if that's where "most of the job is done".



What he means by sensitivity is change in downforce with respect to yaw angle, with the goal being as little loss in downforce with increased yaw. When a car is cornering, there is an angle between the actual vehicle heading and the direction that the nose is pointing, this is the yaw angle. It is a function of tire slip angles and can vary with change in lateral acceleration or turning radius. Its important for the front wing to maintain a consistently high level of downforce at all reasonable yaw angles so that its performance does not suffer in certain types of corners or with certain types of tires (dif compounds or rain tires).



Also, if the front wing, or any other aerodynamic components for that matter lose downforce at yaw angle then when a driver makes a slight mistake (ie:oversteer bobble) it will be much harder to regain control because of the instantaneous loss of available grip.
~confused yet?~
K-nowledge
 
Joined: 18 Apr 2007


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