Sauber C24

A place to discuss the characteristics of the cars in Formula One, both current as well as historical. Laptimes, driver worshipping and team chatter does not belong here.
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Steven
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Joined: Mon Aug 19, 2002 5:32 pm
Location: Belgium

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hehe eoghan :D

anyway, since it is kind of strange to have such a difference in a day, I think the official pics were taken earlier, even before the officially scheduled launch which had been cancelled.
Maybe at that time it wasn't completely ready.

Well again, nice job. Seems to me that we might expect some aero-things from Sauber this year ;) It may be a way to increase downforce when driving close behind another car (just guessing, but they can simulate 2 slipstreaming cars in their windtunnel though)

eoghan
eoghan
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Could be one of the inovations that Jaques alluded to after joining the team.

The creativity towards the end of last year and the C24 in particular is impressive.

On a personal note I have always admired Sauber and have often felt that they just need 'something' to click before being capable of serious results.

As with every year I'm looking forward to the car launchs but this year there is the added intrigue of how the teams will deal with the new regulations.

If Sauber have created this what can we expect from the other creative teams?

eoghan
eoghan
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Also meant to say - good point about the slipstreaming. It's a shame I can't make it to the test to see if they do any close running - but Jerez does not stike me as being a typical slipstream circuit.

Hmmm...plenty to keep us guessing I suppose :D

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Monstrobolaxa
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Joined: Sat Dec 28, 2002 10:36 pm
Location: Covilhã, Portugal (and sometimes in Évora)

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Damn.....Sauber beet me the the high downforce wing.... :( Since 1996 I've been working on one.....I have a model made 1/2 made from balsa....still trying to pass it into CATIA and then CFD it....but my studies are always in front.....there goes the second of my briliant ideas....

Reca
Reca
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Joined: Sun Dec 21, 2003 5:22 pm
Location: Monza, Italy

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Ferrari tested something similar (although the upper element was of shorter chord) in Malaysia 2001, then they reverted to the more usual double flap, Prost then adopted the same concept in Montecarlo.
Furthermore in the Benzing’s book “Dall’aerodinamica alla potenza in Formula 1” there’s a pic and of a triplane front wing fitted on a F2 car, a Chevron B2, during a test in 1978 in the Orbassano’s Fiat wind tunnel.

As always, there’s nothing new under the sun... and in this case in particular... the biplane dates back to one day of December 1903...

BTW, first impression of the C24 : Excellent work guys, especially in the area hidden by that yellow bargeboard

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sharkie17
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Joined: Fri Apr 16, 2004 2:38 am
Location: Texas

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i think its the best looking 2005 reg F1 car so far...

cant wait to see the rest.

dumrick
dumrick
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Joined: Mon Jan 19, 2004 12:36 pm
Location: Portugal

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A predecessor:

Image

To compare:

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More details on the engine cover:

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Fabulous sidepod art!!!!

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(100th post!!!! Hooray!!)

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Steven
Owner
Joined: Mon Aug 19, 2002 5:32 pm
Location: Belgium

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Well the hot air and exhaust outleft look very well integrated in the package and seem to divide the F1 team into two camps: some of them using shark gills, others implementing chimneys...

About the nose however, I really think it kind of looks like a duck. I have the impression that is a rather thin but very wide nose :o

Scuderia-Russ
Scuderia-Russ
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Wow.If there's a championship for the best looking car i think Sauber might win it this year.I only hope that they do not have any cooling issues with those sidepods.

DaveKillens
DaveKillens
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Joined: Thu Jan 20, 2005 3:02 am

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x
Last edited by DaveKillens on Wed Sep 02, 2009 4:30 am, edited 1 time in total.

akbar21881
akbar21881
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Joined: Sat Jun 28, 2003 9:49 pm
Location: bristol,uk

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What spec is the engine that they are using now? same as 2005 Ferrari? It seems that if the engine regulation keep changing, Sauber will always get latest from Ferrari then.BTW, the design of the car is STUNNING!!!

Irvingthien
Irvingthien
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Joined: Mon Nov 17, 2003 2:40 am

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The engine cover is stunning, using shark "gils" instead of having an exhaust and the hot air outlet in one package, now why didn't I think of that.

Reca
Reca
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Joined: Sun Dec 21, 2003 5:22 pm
Location: Monza, Italy

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DaveKillens wrote: First off, the addition of that slanted wing delivers a triangulated structure, and I'm very sure that wing is a lot lighter than anyone else.
I’m quite sure it’s a bit heavier for the simple fact that it has two parts more (the structural advantage you are claiming isn’t decisive so it would allow to gain very little weight on the other elements, not enough to justify a brand new design so IMO flap and main plane are just the standard ones) but I’m also pretty sure they don’t care about it.
DaveKillens wrote: It appears that any air passing on the outside of the plate at the end of the wings, then passing over the horizontal splitter, would tend to be drawn toward the centerline of the car, and directed upward.
Are you totally sure that thru the cut in the endplate the flow is passing from outside to inside ?

dumrick
dumrick
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Joined: Mon Jan 19, 2004 12:36 pm
Location: Portugal

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Reca wrote:
DaveKillens wrote:It appears that any air passing on the outside of the plate at the end of the wings, then passing over the horizontal splitter, would tend to be drawn toward the centerline of the car, and directed upward.
Are you totally sure that thru the cut in the endplate the flow is passing from outside to inside ?
It's conventional thinking that below and behind a wing there's low pressure... assuming that it provides downforce... :D

Reca
Reca
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Joined: Sun Dec 21, 2003 5:22 pm
Location: Monza, Italy

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dumrick wrote: It's conventional thinking that below and behind a wing there's low pressure... assuming that it provides downforce...
If the pressure behind a wing is too low then the wing is stalled. The pressure behind the wing is just slightly lower than upstream. And considering the complexity of that particular case, to me at least, to predict what really happens downstream that wing, considering the main wing and the flap under it, the vortex generator on the outside of the endplate, the rotating wheel, the shape of the endplate itself, the brake duct downstream the wing etc etc... isn’t very immediate. According to this picture :
http://www.fluent.com/about/news/pr/img/pr_81_lg2.jpg
in a standard design, without the biplane, the streamlines appears to pass from inside to outside. Hence why I asked if he’s sure.