1:10 Ferrari SF15-T

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kosioBG
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1:10 Ferrari SF15-T

Post by kosioBG » Wed May 04, 2016 4:41 pm

Hello again everybody! After a long absence, I’m back with a new project, and sincerely hope the wait has been worth it. So without further ado, let’s plunge into the build of the Ferrari SF15-T of 2015.


Monocoque

Let us talk about the drawings and collection of information first, as this is a step hugely underestimated in my previous reports. Firstly, I scanned the whole topic on F1T for useful photos and collected them in a folder. Then, I searched specifically for any components not present in my collection. As soon as I’d acquired a good overall impression of the car, I made a side and top view of the whole car. This involved a long search for dimensions, partly in the regulations and also trying to measure them off photos (several of the same thing, shot from different angles, perspective taken into account as accurately as possible). It served as a guide for these more detailed monocoque drawings:
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With these drawings, I could proceed to production. My aim was to work very cleanly and neatly. 1:10 is new territory for me, but it turned out to be very pleasant. The first few pics show the basic structure of the monocoque. Something I had to adapt to was the different behavior of cardboard thickness in relation to its size compared to 1:18. It is less stiff (needs more layers), but allows for much more precise sculpting. It’s just like the process of building a carbon fibre road bike – apply material where needed. The front bulkhead, for example, is made up of three layers of cardboard. This layup also ensures much higher stiffness, as glue soaks into the paper fibres and solidifies them.
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Once the basic shape was complete, I worked on the internals, which honestly was a real pain in the ass. NO specific info is to be found about pedals, steering etc, so it was more or less guesswork. Nevertheless, I gave it my best. First came the dampers, rockers, and anti-rollbar.
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I’m particularly proud of the steering column. I included realistic universal joints, and in addition, the spot where the steering wheel will later be attached came out nicely (the “V” under the windshield).
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The pedals were even more difficult to figure out, this is what I came up with:
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With these bits installed, I could glue the top and bottom half of the monocoque. Here, I used reinforcement angled pieces which I could cut to form a nice fillet. It then got covered with a thin sheet of paper and sanded for a smoother surface and additional stiffness.
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Next, I started working on the outside. I applied the basic red cover – a time-consuming process. It had to consist of one piece only which conforms to curves in different planes. This means that I had to introduce slices which allowed bending but were as unnoticeable as possible. A measure I only reluctantly took, but it couldn’t be avoided. I also added carbon fibre texture and the characteristic white line.
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The covering continued around the cockpit opening. Here, the shape defining process was even more complex. Several attempts were made until I arrived at the correct shape, and even then, I had to sand and thin the paper in specific regions so that in the end it sit where it should.
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The next step was adding the sidepods’ holders and their cooling gills, as well as the radiator bases with their special cooling winglets. The leading edges turned out neat, and to my satisfaction got firmly glued to the chassis. As for the winglets, Ferrari ran radiators which were relatively flat, so they serve the purpose of sending air up for more efficient cooling.
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This step also involved the application of the heat shielding on the sides and back wall of the cockpit, as well as the holes for the engine. Here, I consulted my front view drawing and made an engine positioning jig to make sure the actual one will later fit properly.
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Some small but really satisfying details followed – the rear view mirrors and the fins situated right behind them. Gently bending and sculpting the cardboard, adding screws and sanding to achieve smooth curvatures was enjoyable.
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The air box was the final component in this area. Note the additional slot under the big air inlet. This piece is characterized by a complex, two axis curvature.
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I later added the transponders and TV cameras. Especially the one on the right-hand side turned out nicely, with a beautiful fillet. It also surprised me how stiff the bond is, even though there are no reinforcing elements supporting it.
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The closing stages of this report include the cockpit’s internal walls, with some logos and the ignition/switch box. Also, on the top surface: the pitot tubes, suspension adjustment panel, the windshield. Not much to say about them really.
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Moving further forward, the turning vanes. I built the USA spec ones (with three elements). I chose to omit the “bat” wing and apply no carbon fibre here to achieve cleanness. The result was smooth and I liked it.
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And finally, the front bulkhead details. Pics of them were scarce, but I managed an acceptable level of detail. From top to bottom, respectively: steering rod holder (joint with the top wishbone’s front leg), some kind of control box?, brake fluid reservoirs, electrical connectors (these were tiny, but great fun to glue together), lower wishbone supports and right at the bottom, nose supports. The curved piece on top of them all is a cover, I guess. It looks quite the part 
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I then sanded all surfaces using my new homemade sanding kit, featuring sandpapers ranging from P400 to P2000. I also made some useful “files”. The decals were pretty easy to find and as usual, I reworked them with Adobe Illustrator. I glued them in place and covered everything with two coats of water-based Marabu varnish. On the following day, I applied further two coats of an oil-based one to achieve a glossy finish.
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Just enjoy the glossiness :D
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That’s pretty much it for now. 1:10 is taking much more time than 1:18, but I think it’s worth the patience (420 pieces on the table, or about 40 hours of work). I hope you enjoyed this report. Comments and suggestions are very welcome! And for more, please visit my website.

Cheers :)

Daliracing
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Re: 1:10 Ferrari SF15-T

Post by Daliracing » Wed May 11, 2016 9:19 pm

Damn what an improvement!

Alonso Fan
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Re: 1:10 Ferrari SF15-T

Post by Alonso Fan » Sat Jul 16, 2016 4:34 pm

Simply superb! What an improvement indeed.

If you don't mind, my only suggestion would be that for your next model, perhaps you should use paint. Might save you a lot of time
MVRC - SHM Racing

bhall II
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Re: 1:10 Ferrari SF15-T

Post by bhall II » Sat Jul 16, 2016 7:33 pm

kosioBG wrote:Comments and suggestions are very welcome!
If we all had your dedication, I think the world would look a whole lot different*.

Seriously, I've not run into too many people who can lay claim to the perseverance required to transcend beyond the "I'm new and suck at this" stage.

Your work is now legitimately impressive in any context.

__________
* And in a good way provided we could also figure out how to deal with antisocial personalities, because the last thing some of those folks need is more motivation!

kosioBG
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Re: 1:10 Ferrari SF15-T

Post by kosioBG » Wed Jul 20, 2016 5:21 pm

Hi again, after a long pause (which I'd like to call a 'creative break', a period during which I simply didn't feel like working on the car) I'm back fresh and the Ferrari just received its next component. But before I start the report, I'd like to dedicate it to everyone on this forum who has noticed my progress and been nice enough to write a kind comment (bhall ll, Alonso fan and Dali racing in particular). Your words really make my work feel special, because my friends can't appreciate it really, as they have no f1 knowledge. But let's get to business, or as my favourite Rob Walker of BBC puts it, (when it's snooker time): "Let's get the boys on the baize!"

Underbody
Just like my previous report, I'd like to start with the collection of information. Now the underbody is a dark area of the car :lol: :lol: I used primarily pics of areas such as the barge boards, diffuser and other diverse surrounding details. Of course, the main shape conforms to the master drawing, as it has to hold everything in the correct position. And the wooden plank underneath is (as unfortunately for me so few other parts) is defined to the milimetre by the rulebook. So I started with the basic shape. As you can see, the central area where the cockpit and powertrain sit is lower than the periphery, and I was concerned that it would not be laterally stiff enough. Therefore it consists of two layers and is now definitely stiff enough. However, the layering technique is vastly different fron the one I used on the MP4-30, so that now the floor edges are thinner and more realistic.
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Having completed the base, I gradually started 'populating' it with details. There really isn't much to say about them. It's just a repetition of looking at photos, designing templates, gluing them in place. A technique worth mentioning that I only recently adopted was the one where I sand the pieces of paper/cardboard to make them fit properly. This is visible if you look at the small black vertical board with two holes (it will later hold the vertical element next to the sidepod panels). Also, I took into account that Ferrari use a different carbon weave for the larger floor surfaces.
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The underside received a coat of thin black paper and some varnish. This is how nicely the diffuser curvature turned out:
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And this is the completed underbody with its roughly 175 pieces. Enjoy the exquisite detailing around the trailing edge: the two flaps, the vertical elements, the two tiny pairs of winglets (you may wish to zoom in). I have to assure you, these are great fun to make.
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And here's the side of it you'll almost never get to see on the real car. The exact curvature paths of the diffuser strakes are as accurate as I could work out of rear views. The little silver detail is the cap of the starter hole.
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The plank with its bolts:
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And an overview, followed by the monocoque fitted for illustrative purposes.
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Enjoy :D

Daliracing
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Re: 1:10 Ferrari SF15-T

Post by Daliracing » Tue Oct 04, 2016 8:13 pm

Great work mate! hope to see more of it soon! keep up the work we really enjoy it!

kosioBG
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Re: 1:10 Ferrari SF15-T

Post by kosioBG » Sat Oct 15, 2016 9:09 pm

Hi again!
I know it’s been a long time since my last post. But there were some significant events in my life, mostly moving to Austria. Here’s my new “office-workshop”
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But I’m back to business now, so expect more development of the PU. Also, I met none other than Paul Bischof in person! So motivation isn’t missing either. Still, I haven’t progressed all that much. I managed to build the engine and the gearbox, which I wanted to share at this point. Waiting for the completed PU would’ve taken too long. So let’s start with the engine.
As I’ve said many times this is the area of the car with the scarcest detail available. I spent a lot of time studying photographs trying to figure out what is where. Because the engine is one of these components which determine the positions of many others. You have to get it right, because otherwise the gearbox, cooling, electrical motors and even bodywork might go wrong. Some drawings:
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Then, it was all about building a stable and sufficiently stiff main shape block. One aspect I paid attention to were the mounting points to the cockpit and gearbox. You can see the framework, the engine block is actually quite stiff.
Once the shape was finalized, I tried to replicate the cast metal look.
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And finally, the details followed. They were mainly bolts, cooling pipes (a nightmare to figure out – it’s just like trying to trace the beginning and an end of a spaghetti string inside a bowl), drive shaft and some other minor things, such as the water pump. Then, it was onto varnishing.
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The gearbox followed more or less the same building approach. Still, some words on it. The basic shape is more complex compared to the engine’s. That’s evident when you look at the drawing. Its cross-sections vary constantly, so I decided to use a simple box technique for the front part and a framework for the rear.
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On the inside, you can see supports for the suspension wishbones, rear rockers (but not hard music fans) and dampers and some heat shielding where the exhaust pipes lead to the turbine. It’s the first gearbox with some internal components.
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Once the inside was finished, I could enclose the construction with its nicely curved top and its exhaust slot. It then underwent a ‘cow’ stage – this was to ensure that after the cabon fibre coating, no white areas would be visible from underneath.
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Then, the carbon coating itself. It wasn’t too easy, because I always try to use as few pieces and therefore as few seams as possible. This means that all suspension slots have to be cut in advance and fit perfectly. I then varnished it once and added most details. Some, for example cooling pipes and of course the rear crash structure, are still missing.
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And here, an illustration of how everything fits together. It’s incredible how tiny the engine actually is in the context of the whole car!
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In the next weeks, I’ll be focusing on the other components which make up the PU. Many exciting reports to come, so keep checking the thread every now and again.
Cheers! :D
Last edited by kosioBG on Mon Oct 17, 2016 10:50 am, edited 1 time in total.

Alonso Fan
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Re: 1:10 Ferrari SF15-T

Post by Alonso Fan » Sat Oct 15, 2016 9:47 pm

Can't see the pictures, but from what you've written, seems like awesome stuff!
MVRC - SHM Racing

kosioBG
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Re: 1:10 Ferrari SF15-T

Post by kosioBG » Sat Oct 15, 2016 9:51 pm

Alonso Fan wrote:Can't see the pictures
maybe try and refresh?

fredtome
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Re: 1:10 Ferrari SF15-T

Post by fredtome » Wed Dec 14, 2016 6:40 pm

Awesome stuff.

kosioBG
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Re: 1:10 Ferrari SF15-T

Post by kosioBG » Mon Dec 26, 2016 10:50 pm

fredtome wrote:Awesome stuff.
Hey, thanks for the kind words.
Quick report on the car's progress: it's kind of slow due to lowered motivation :( , but will hopefully be back on par soon.
Wish you a merry Christmas and an inspired 2017! See you then :D

bauc
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Re: 1:10 Ferrari SF15-T

Post by bauc » Tue Dec 27, 2016 3:34 pm

WoW, what a job you've done. I loved your work on the mp4-30 but this is on another scale, so please keep up the great work and I can't wait to see the final product.
Формула 1 на Македонски - The first ever Macedonian Formula 1 YouTube channel
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kosioBG
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Re: 1:10 Ferrari SF15-T

Post by kosioBG » Fri Mar 23, 2018 10:45 pm

Powertrain completion

Hey! I know it's been a while, but I was lacking in motivation for some time to work on the car. However, on a recent cold afternoon, I decided I'd return to my beloved hobby. So I spent a long day finishing up the powertrain and mounting all bits and pieces to the chassis.
I had painfully slowly created most of the components, which include every major part of the real powertrain. Some bits do miss and I may add them later, such as internal aero and the electrical components under the radiators.
I guess it took me so long because information and pictures of the area are really scarce. So I won't go into too much detail, I tried to replicate everything as well as I could. In the end, thankfully, the puzzle did fit :D
Working in 1:10 scale is allowing much better quality than before, but also in a way it's more demanding: it requires detailed pieces. Here are some of the more beautiful individual components:
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The exhaust manifold was a new challenge for me and I had to devise a way to replicate the intricate curves:
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Skipping quite a bit of boring steps, here's the assembly's current status:
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That's it for now.But: let me whet your appetite: the nosecone is already complete and the varnish is drying as I'm writing these lines. So please do believe me that more is coming soon :lol: :lol:

Thanks for watching!

Alonso Fan
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Re: 1:10 Ferrari SF15-T

Post by Alonso Fan » Fri Mar 23, 2018 10:59 pm

Excellent work! I am patiently waiting for the end of my university exams in a couple of months to continue my own project too!
MVRC - SHM Racing

Just_a_fan
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Re: 1:10 Ferrari SF15-T

Post by Just_a_fan » Sat Mar 24, 2018 1:55 am

Two words: humbled, respect.

Great job, I'm humbled by the level of detail and care you have applied (I wouldn't be able to do it). Respect is due! =D> =D> =D>
Turbo says "Dumpster sounds so much more classy. It's the diamond of the cesspools." oh, and "The Dutch fans are drunk. Maybe"