f1 2000 engine

All that has to do with the power train, gearbox, clutch, fuels and lubricants, etc. Generally the mechanical side of Formula One.
snitch
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Joined: Sat Jul 05, 2003 9:18 am

f1 2000 engine

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hi all,


i was wondering if anyone has any f1 2000 ferrari engine images,


cheers

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Steven
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Joined: Mon Aug 19, 2002 5:32 pm
Location: Belgium

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here ya go
was looking for the engine's name, but couldn't find it immediately though. Anyone else?

nontheless, this is for sure an engine for the F1-2000

Image

Monstrobolaxa
Monstrobolaxa
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Joined: Sat Dec 28, 2002 10:36 pm
Location: Covilhã, Portugal (and sometimes in Évora)

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not to sure about the pic....in 2000 they had 72º right? ....it seems to me that the one in the pic is a 90º (last years.....probably)...but not to sure!!!

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Steven
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Joined: Mon Aug 19, 2002 5:32 pm
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meanwhile, I've found the engine we are looking for is the 049 V10
you make me doubt on the picture though, but before I was quite certain :D

Monstrobolaxa
Monstrobolaxa
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I liked your last post.....makes me feel important!!!!!! hahahah but I'm not to sure about what I said....I'll check it out...and next time I'll try to post the main diferences between both engines.....(esteticly)

Andi76
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Re:

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Monstrobolaxa wrote:
Sat Jul 05, 2003 10:43 am
not to sure about the pic....in 2000 they had 72º right? ....it seems to me that the one in the pic is a 90º (last years.....probably)...but not to sure!!!
Another correction to a very old post - this IS the 2000 engine. Ferrari never used a 72° Engine. In 2000 they used a 90° engine, after using a 80° engine in 98 and 99. In 1996 and 1997 Ferraris first V10 engines had the same V-angle as their V12s - 75°.

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coaster
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Joined: Sat Jun 30, 2012 4:10 am

Re: f1 2000 engine

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Ive got tonnes of downloaded images from trawling the net in the 2000's, most image have been removed now from being unmaintained.
I'd post some, but the original author would need due recognition at the very least, its a real pain in the ass.
I have not kept any info about the sources, I just hoarded indiscriminately.

saviour stivala
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Re: f1 2000 engine

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Engine in picture is FERRARI tipo 049 90 degree 3.0l v10 of year 2000.
FERRARI first v10 was tipo 046 75 degree v10.
Tipo 047 and 048 v10’s were 80 degree.
Tipo 049 v10 was 90 degree.
Unlike Ilmor/Mercedes FERRARI did not use single and v-twin research and development engines for its v10’s developments, developments were carried out on complete engines. Using four dynamometers, one of which was right bellow the wind tunnel with the airbox intruding into it and was subject to aerodynamic pressure of the running car (ability to simulate all running conditions). Another dyno was capable of running the complete powertrain, this one was also used for gearbox developments. The above is now past the 22 years mark.

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coaster
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Re: f1 2000 engine

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I recall Luca Marmorini was key designer from the end of V12 until the early 048, Paolo Martinelli took over and Marmorini went Toyota.
Late 048 had different cylinder heads which may have carried over to 049 up until 053.
The f2000 book has disassembled heads with 048 part numbers engraved on the 049.
I think of Martinellis design as one long continous evolution of the 049 90 degree motor, i assume the late 048 was a test bed for his ideas.

saviour stivala
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Re: f1 2000 engine

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When Martinelli joined the Scuderia in 1995, it was the last year a V-12 was raced. FERRARI’s first v-10 was Martinelli’s first race engine, he worked with Gilles Simon on the design of the tipo 046 75 degree V-10. Martinelli – ‘’The V-12 arrangement is better for the engine alone, but less good for the whole package of car and engine. Putting the requirements of the whole car before those of the engine, required a ‘major’ cultural shift at FERRARI’’.

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coaster
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Re: f1 2000 engine

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Gilles Simon was the designer of the defunct Alfa V10 yes?
That explains some of similarities the 046 design.
I was of the impression that after Marmorini stepped aside then Martinelli came to the fore of design decisions, leading the team.

Toyotas V10 closely follows Ferraris architecture and it would be no coincidence.

If you look at the Peugoet V10 the external package looks similar to 050 to 053, i wonder Todt hired some of those guys?

saviour stivala
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Re: f1 2000 engine

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There is no question that Marmorini will be marked in history as one of the top experienced and best formula 1 engine designers. As Martinelli had noted, there came a time when the racing package was the most important of the racing car design. The package design have to be the best compromise between chassis and engine departments. The cardinal mistake Marmorini did when he returned back to FERRARI from Toyota was to give-in to total demands of the chassis department, and in so doing totally sacrificed his own engine design (2014 power unit design). Later on this same mistake befell the Honda F1 return with mclaren, in the case of mclaren/Honda it was worse because while Honda produced the power unit, mclaren produced the gearbox. So the power train was a twin separate design. Re the Peugeot F1 engine mentioned. If I remember correctly it was the only engine in F1 at the time running a roller bearing crankshaft.

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coaster
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Re: f1 2000 engine

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Not so much the roller crank, but external design, use of rectangle radiused corner oil port, thin wall alloy casing, oil and water passages one peice with the block wall, Peugoet were way ahead with packaging.
Ferrari were still iron block V12's with simplistic scavenge sumps when the Peugoet was at Renaults level of external design.

Sadly, they gambled the house on the small bore and it held back the power.