What car do u drive and what have u driven so far?

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djos
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Joined: Fri May 19, 2006 5:09 am
Location: Melbourne, Australia

Re: What car do u drive and what have u driven so far?

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Phil wrote:
Wed Dec 11, 2019 9:41 am
This is good information about the DCT. However, how damaging slow driving is to these transmissions surely also depends on the gear ratio? E.g. a longer first gear will mean the clutch could fully engage at lower speed? Meaning that the slipping would only occur at speeds from 1kmh to 4-5kmh, rather than up to 10-15kmh?

I guess i never really thought about that, but given i do find myself in traffic jams every now and then, driving at walking speeds sometimes, even up hill, is unavoidable in these situations.
Most DCT cars I’ve driven have a very short 1st ratio (including my own).
The impossible often has a kind of integrity which the merely improbable lacks.

Tommy Cookers
Tommy Cookers
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Joined: Fri Feb 17, 2012 3:55 pm

Re: What car do u drive and what have u driven so far?

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SmallSoldier wrote:
Tue Dec 10, 2019 10:50 pm
....Actually, In traffic, the DCT will always be better than a manual, since the clutch slip is regulated... Furthermore, most DCT’s have “wet clutches” and won’t burn themselves in that situation...

What is not advisable is to push the car in “normal” Mode, thus is because the clutch pressure in normal/comfort mode is very low and that will induce clutch slip and therefore faster wear of the clutches.
are these clutches friction clutches ? ...or ...
non-torque-multiplying fluid couplings ? ...or ...
contact-load-modulated friction clutches ? (eg hydraulically modulated)

CVTs wore their clutches where owners thought they gave non-wearing creep like a fluid coupling
likewise most of the semi-automatics

Jolle
Jolle
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Joined: Wed Jan 29, 2014 9:58 pm
Location: Dordrecht

Re: What car do u drive and what have u driven so far?

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Tommy Cookers wrote:
Wed Dec 11, 2019 11:26 am
SmallSoldier wrote:
Tue Dec 10, 2019 10:50 pm
....Actually, In traffic, the DCT will always be better than a manual, since the clutch slip is regulated... Furthermore, most DCT’s have “wet clutches” and won’t burn themselves in that situation...

What is not advisable is to push the car in “normal” Mode, thus is because the clutch pressure in normal/comfort mode is very low and that will induce clutch slip and therefore faster wear of the clutches.
are these clutches friction clutches ? ...or ...
non-torque-multiplying fluid couplings ? ...or ...
contact-load-modulated friction clutches ? (eg hydraulically modulated)

CVTs wore their clutches where owners thought they gave non-wearing creep like a fluid coupling
likewise most of the semi-automatics
I think DTC’s normally have multi plate dry friction clutches, like race cars. Except the first generation VW’s, they had wet clutches. A dry clutch is more efficient then a wet one.

SmallSoldier
SmallSoldier
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Joined: Sun Mar 10, 2019 2:54 am

Re: What car do u drive and what have u driven so far?

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Jolle wrote:
Tommy Cookers wrote:
Wed Dec 11, 2019 11:26 am
SmallSoldier wrote:
Tue Dec 10, 2019 10:50 pm
....Actually, In traffic, the DCT will always be better than a manual, since the clutch slip is regulated... Furthermore, most DCT’s have “wet clutches” and won’t burn themselves in that situation...

What is not advisable is to push the car in “normal” Mode, thus is because the clutch pressure in normal/comfort mode is very low and that will induce clutch slip and therefore faster wear of the clutches.
are these clutches friction clutches ? ...or ...
non-torque-multiplying fluid couplings ? ...or ...
contact-load-modulated friction clutches ? (eg hydraulically modulated)

CVTs wore their clutches where owners thought they gave non-wearing creep like a fluid coupling
likewise most of the semi-automatics
I think DTC’s normally have multi plate dry friction clutches, like race cars. Except the first generation VW’s, they had wet clutches. A dry clutch is more efficient then a wet one.
Performance oriented cars use DCTs with a multi plate wet clutch configuration... The use of oil with clutches and friction plates is to help dissipate heat... Dry applications are usually used in low torque / performance vehicles

Porsche, BMW Ms, Nissan GTRs for example use wet clutch DCTs


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strad
268
Joined: Sat Jan 02, 2010 12:57 am

Re: What car do u drive and what have u driven so far?

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The 2020 GT500 is going to have a DCT with a "wet/dry" clutch pack.
It's only "wet" when it start over heating.
To achieve anything, you must be prepared to dabble on the boundary of disaster.”
Sir Stirling Moss